Reading CVC Words2022-04-21T14:20:57-04:00
Reading CVC Words

Posted by: Alesia Netuk

Updated: April 21st, 2022

Reading CVC Words

Reading CVC Words

CVC words are three-letter words that begin with a consonant, have a vowel in the middle, and end with a consonant. Words like “hat,” “top,” and “cab” are CVC words. They provide excellent starting points for beginning readers.

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A precursor to reading is learning the sounds that letters make. Without this solid recall, reading CVC words is difficult. Wait until children can proficiently identify sounds, then move on to the next step, which is having them blend sounds together to form a word. This is an important process, and it is essential for both reading and writing that children learn how to blend sounds fluidly, as opposed to barking out each sound individually and then struggling to put them back together. CVC words lend themselves well to this process.

When introducing CVC words, the goal is to set children up for success. Choose words that contain sounds they know well. It is also key to choose words that have distinct sounds that are easy to identify. For example, the /a/ sound is easy to hear in “cat,” but less distinct in the word “can.” Also, think about which vowel sounds children know best. This is often the /a/ sound, but maybe something else.

When introducing CVC words, start with one vowel sound. You can use games to help children practice. Model how to blend the sounds together smoothly. For example, the word “cab” should not sound like “cu-a-bu,” with the addition of short ‘u’ sounds added. This can make reading the word difficult. Instead, model how to say the word slowly, with each sound blending into the next.

Example of explicit instructions when teaching reading CVC words

Today you’re going to learn the word cab. Say the word. cab

BLEND IT
Let’s say the sounds in the word. Finger tap the word to sound it out. /k/ /a/ /b/
Say the sounds again. This time slide your finger across the arrow as you read sounds. How many sounds are in the word cab? How many sounds are in the word cab? 3 (you can use segmenting and blending cards below)

READ IT
The word cab has a short a in the middle. The sound for short a is /a/. Read the list of words with a short /a/ sound. (provide a list of words)

SPELL & WRITE IT
Let’s write the missing letters. What letter spells the sound /k/? (c) Write/trace the letter c. What letter spells the sound /a/? (a) Write/trace the letter a. What letter spells the sound /b/? (a) Write/trace the letter b. How do you spell the word cab? C-A-B (you can use Read-Spell-Write activity below)

reading cvc words

Segmenting and Blending Cards